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    Results 1 to 17 of 17
    1. #1
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      The 133rd birthday anniversary of the Poet of the East, Doctor Allama Mohammed Iqbal would be observed today (Tuesday) with traditional zeal and fervour.

      Muhammad Iqbal (Punjabi, Urdu: علامہ محمد اقبال; November 9, 1877 Sialkot – April 21, 1938 Lahore) was a Persian and Urdu poet, philosopher and politician.Whose vision of an independent state for the Muslims of British India was to inspire the creation of Pakistan. He is commonly referred to as Allama Iqbal (علامہ اقبال‎, Allama meaning "Scholar").






      He was Sufi poet of the modern age. He aroused revolutionary spirit in the nation through his poetry. Sophism and Islamic touch are prominent of his poetry.

      His poetry has been translated in Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, English and several other languages and he is considered a great philosopher all over the world.

      As a great politician, his great achievement was to think of the ideology of Pakistan, which later became the base of independence of Pakistan.

      Unfortunately, he could not see the independence of Pakistan and died on April 21, 1938.


      Khudi ka sirr-e-nehaaaN La ilaaha il Allah
      khudi hai tegh-e-fusaaN La ilaaha il Allah

      Yeh daur apnaY 'Baraheem ki talaash maiN hai
      Sanam-kadaah hai jahaaaN La ilaaaaha il Allah

      Kiiyaa hai tu naY mataa'-e-ghuroor ka sauda
      fareb-e-sood-o-ziyaaaaaN ! La ilaaaha il Allah

      Yeh maal-O-daulat-e-duniya, yeh rishta-O-paivand
      bu'taaaan-e-vehm-o-gumaaaaaN! La ilaaha il Allah

      Khird huwee hai zamaan-O-makaaN kee zunnaari
      na hai zamaaaaN, na makaaaaN! La ilaaha il Allah

      Yeh naghma, fas'l-e-gul-o-laaleh ka naheeN paabaNd
      bahaaaaaaar ho kaY khizaaaaaaaaN, La ilaaha il Allah

      AgarchaY bu't haiN jama'at kee aasteenoN maiN
      mujhaY hai hukm-e-azaaaaaN, La ilaaha il Allah ...

    2. #2
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      History of Allam Iqbal

      Sheikh Muhammad Iqbal was born in Sialkot, Punjab, British India (now part of Pakistan); the eldest of five siblings in a Kashmiri family. It is believed that Iqbal's family were originally Hindu Brahmins, but became Muslim following his ancestor Sahaj Ram Sapru's conversion to Islam, although this version is disputed by some scholars. Iqbal's father Shaikh Nur Muhammad was a prosperous tailor, well-known for his devotion to Islam, and the family raised their children with deep religious grounding.

      The boy was educated initially by tutors in languages and writing, history, poetry and religion. His potential as a poet and writer was recognised by one of his tutors, Sayyid Mir Hassan, and Iqbal would continue to study under him at the Scotch Mission College in Sialkot. The student became proficient in several languages and the skill of writing prose and poetry, and graduated in 1892. Following custom, at the age of 15 Iqbal's family arranged for him to be married to Karim Bibi, the daughter of an affluent Gujrati physician. The couple had two children: a daughter, Mi'raj Begam (born 1895) and a son, Aftab (born 1899). Iqbal's third son died soon after birth. The husband and wife were unhappy in their marriage and eventually divorced in 1916.

      Iqbal entered the Government College in Lahore where he studied philosophy, English literature and Arabic and obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree, graduating cum laude. He won a gold medal for topping his examination in philosophy. While studying for his masters degree, Iqbal came under the wing of Sir Thomas Arnold, a scholar of Islam and modern philosophy at the college. Arnold exposed the young man to Western culture and ideas, and served as a bridge for Iqbal between the ideas of East and West.

      Iqbal was appointed to a readership in Arabic at the Oriental College in Lahore, and he published his first book in Urdu, The Knowledge of Economics in 1903. In 1905 Iqbal published the patriotic song, Tarana-e-Hind (Song of India).
      At Sir Thomas's encouragement, Iqbal travelled to and spend many years studying in Europe. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Trinity College at Cambridge in 1907, while simultaneously studying law at Lincoln's Inn, from where he qualified as a barrister in 1908. Iqbal also met a Muslim student, Atiyah Faizi in 1907, and had a close relationship with her. In Europe, he started writing his poetry in Persian as well.

      Throughout his life, Iqbal would prefer writing in Persian as he believed it allowed him to fully express philosophical concepts, and it gave him a wider audience. It was while in England that he first participated in politics.

      Following the formation of the All-India Muslim League in 1906, Iqbal was elected to the executive committee of its British chapter in 1908. Together with two other politicians, Syed Hassan Bilgrami and Syed Ameer Ali, Iqbal sat on the subcommittee which drafted the constitution of the League.

      In 1907, Iqbal travelled to Germany to pursue a doctorate from the Faculty of Philosophy of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University at Munich. Working under the supervision of Friedrich Hommel, Iqbal published a thesis titled: The Development of Metaphysics in Persia.

      Upon his return to India in 1908, Iqbal took up assistant professorship at the Government College in Lahore, but for financial reasons he relinquished it within a year to practise law. During this period, Iqbal's personal life was in turmoil. He divorced Karim Bibi in 1916, but provided financial support to her and their children for the rest of his life.

      While maintaining his legal practise, Iqbal began concentrating on spiritual and religious subjects, and publishing poetry and literary works. He became active in the Anjuman-e-Himayat-e-Islam, a congress of Muslim intellectuals, writers and poets as well as politicians, and in 1919 became the general secretary of the organisation. Iqbal's thoughts in his work primarily focused on the spiritual direction and development of human society, centred around experiences from his travel and stay in Western Europe and the Middle East. He was profoundly influenced by Western philosophers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Henri Bergson and Goethe, and soon became a strong critic of Western society's separation of religion from state and what he perceived as its obsession with materialist pursuits.

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      Work In Persian

      Iqbal's poetic works are written mostly in Persian rather than Urdu. Among his 12,000 verses of poem, almost more than 7,000 verses are in Persian. In 1915, he published his first collection of poetry, the Asrar-e-Khudi (Secrets of the Self) in Persian. The poems delve into concepts of ego and emphasise the spirit and self from a religious, spiritual perspective. Many critics have called this Iqbal's finest poetic work. In Asrar-e-Khudi, Iqbal has explained his philosophy of "Khudi," or "Self." He proves by various means that the whole universe obeys the will of the "Self." Iqbal condemns self-destruction. For him the aim of life is self-realization and self-knowledge. He charts the stages through which the "Self" has to pass before finally arriving at its point of perfection, enabling the knower of the "Self" to become the viceregent of Allah.

      In his Rumuz-e-Bekhudi (Hints of Selflessness), Iqbal seeks to prove that Islamic way of life is the best code of conduct for a nation's viability. A person must keep his individual characteristics intact but once this is achieved he should sacrifice his personal ambitions for the needs of the nation. Man cannot realise the "Self" out of society.

      Also in Persian and published in 1917, this group of poems has as its main themes the ideal community, Islamic ethical and social principles and the relationship between the individual and society. Although he is true throughout to Islam, Iqbal recognises also the positive analogous aspects of other religions. The Rumuz-e-Bekhudi complements the emphasis on the self in the Asrar-e-Khudi and the two collections are often put in the same volume under the title Asrar-e-Rumuz (Hinting Secrets), and it is addressed to the world's Muslims. Iqbal sees the individual and his community as reflections of each other.

      The individual needs to be strengthened before he can be integrated into the community, whose development in turn depends on the preservation of the communal ego. It is through contact with others that an ego learns to accept the limitations of its own freedom and the meaning of love. Muslim communities must ensure order in life and must therefore preserve their communal tradition. It is in this context that Iqbal sees the vital role of women, who as mothers are directly responsible for inculcating values in their children.

      Iqbal's 1924 publication, the Payam-e-Mashriq (The Message of the East) is closely connected to the West-?icher Diwan by the famous German poet Goethe. Goethe bemoaned that the West had become too materialistic in outlook and expected that the East would provide a message of hope that would resuscitate spiritual values. Iqbal styles his work as a reminder to the West of the importance of morality, religion and civilization by underlining the need for cultivating feeling, ardour and dynamism. He explains that an individual could never aspire for higher dimensions unless he learns of the nature of spirituality. In his first visit to Afghanistan, he presented his book "Payam-e Mashreq" to King Amanullah Khan in which he admired the liberal movements of Afghanistan against the British Empire. In 1933, he was officially invited to Afghanistan to join the meetings regarding the establishment of Kabul University.

      The Zabur-e-Ajam (Persian Psalms), published in 1927, includes the poems Gulshan-e-Raz-e-Jadeed (Garden of New Secrets) and Bandagi Nama (Book of Slavery). In Gulshan-e-Raz-e-Jadeed, Iqbal first poses questions, then answers them with the help of ancient and modern insight and shows how it effects and concerns the world of action. Bandagi Nama denounces slavery by attempting to explain the spirit behind the fine arts of enslaved societies. Here as in other books, Iqbal insists on remembering the past, doing well in the present and preparing for the future, emphasising love, enthusiasm and energy to fill the ideal life. Iqbal's 1932 work, the Javed Nama (Book of Javed) is named after and in a manner addressed to his son, who is featured in the poems, and follows the examples of the works of Ibn Arabi and Dante's The Divine Comedy, through mystical and exaggerated depiction across time. Iqbal depicts himself as Zinda Rud ("A stream full of life") guided by Rumi, "the master," through various heavens and spheres, and has the honour of approaching divinity and coming in contact with divine illuminations. In a passage re-living a historical period, Iqbal condemns the Muslim traitors who were instrumental in the defeat and death of Nawab Siraj-ud-Daula of Bengal and Tipu Sultan of Mysore respectively by betraying them for the benefit of the British colonists, and thus delivering their country to the shackles of slavery. At the end, by addressing his son Javid, he speaks to the young people at large, and provides guidance to the "new generation."

      His love to Persian language is evident in his works and poetry.

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      Work In Urdu

      Iqbal's first work published in Urdu, the Bang-e-Dara (The Call of the Marching Bell) of 1924, was a collection of poetry written by him in three distinct phases of his life. The poems he wrote up to 1905, the year Iqbal left for England imbibe patriotism and imagery of landscape, and includes the Tarana-e-Hind (The Song of India), popularly known as Saare Jahan Se Achcha and another poem Tarana-e-Milli (Anthem of the (muslim) Community), which was composed in the same metre and rhyme scheme as Saare Jahan Se Achcha. The second set of poems date from between 1905 and 1908 when Iqbal studied in Europe and dwell upon the nature of European society, which he emphasized had lost spiritual and religious values. This inspired Iqbal to write poems on the historical and cultural heritage of Islamic culture and Muslim people, not from an Indian but a global perspective. Iqbal urges the global community of Muslims, addressed as the Ummah to define personal, social and political existence by the values and teachings of Islam. Poems such as Tulu'i Islam (Dawn of Islam) and Khizr-e-Rah (The Guided Path) are especially acclaimed.

      Iqbal preferred to work mainly in Persian for a predominant period of his career, but after 1930, his works were mainly in Urdu. The works of this period were often specifically directed at the Muslim masses of India, with an even stronger emphasis on Islam, and Muslim spiritual and political reawakening. Published in 1935, the Bal-e-Jibril (Wings of Gabriel) is considered by many critics as the finest of Iqbal's Urdu poetry, and was inspired by his visit to Spain, where he visited the monuments and legacy of the kingdom of the Moors. It consists of ghazals, poems, quatrains, epigrams and carries a strong sense religious passion.

      The Pas Cheh Bayed Kard ai Aqwam-e-Sharq (What are we to do, O Nations of the East?) includes the poem Musafir (Traveller). Again, Iqbal depicts Rumi as a character and an exposition of the mysteries of Islamic laws and Sufi perceptions is given. Iqbal laments the dissension and disunity among the Indian Muslims as well as Muslim nations. Musafir is an account of one of Iqbal's journeys to Afghanistan, in which the Pashtun people are counseled to learn the "secret of Islam" and to "build up the self" within themselves. Iqbal's final work was the Armughan-e-Hijaz (The Gift of Hijaz), published posthumously in 1938. The first part contains quatrains in Persian, and the second part contains some poems and epigrams in Urdu. The Persian quatrains convey the impression as though the poet is travelling through the Hijaz in his imagination. Profundity of ideas and intensity of passion are the salient features of these short poems. The Urdu portion of the book contains some categorical criticism of the intellectual movements and social and political revolutions of the modern age.

      In 1933, after returning from a trip to Spain and Afghanistan, Iqbal's health deteriorated. He spent his final years working to establish the Idara Dar-ul-Islam, an institution where studies in classical Islam and contemporary social science would be subsidised, and advocating the demand for an independent Muslim state. Iqbal ceased practising law in 1934 and he was granted pension by the Nawab of Bhopal. After suffering for months from a series of protracted illnesses, Iqbal died in Lahore in 1938. His tomb is located in the space between the entrance of the Badshahi Mosque and the Lahore Fort, and an official guard is maintained there by the Government of Pakistan.

      Iqbal is commemorated widely in Pakistan, where he is regarded as the ideological founder of the state. His Tarana-e-Hind is a song that is widely used in India as a patriotic song speaking of communal harmony. His birthday is annually commemorated in Pakistan as Iqbal Day and is a national holiday. For a long time, Iqbal's actual date of birth remained disputed, with many believing February 23 to be the date of Iqbal's birth.On February 1, 1974 a Pakistani government committee officially declared Iqbal's date of birth to be November 9.Iqbal is the namesake of many public institutions, including the Allama Iqbal Open University and the Allama Iqbal International Airport in Lahore ? the second-busiest airport in the nation. Government and public organizations have sponsored the establishment of colleges and schools dedicated to Iqbal, and have established the Iqbal Academy to research, teach and preserve the works, literature and philosophy of Iqbal. His son Javid Iqbal has served as a justice on the Supreme Court of Pakistan.

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      Strange, no one interested to share even one piece of poetry of Allama Iqbal ...
      I guess there should be some thing arranged by the Moderators to celebrate Iqbal Day ...

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      Beautiful thread with beautiful contribution... wonderful job done Amarbail
      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      Majnoon nay sheher chora, tu Sehraa bhi chor day
      Nizaray ki hawas ho tu Laila bhi chor day

      Wa'az! kamal-e-tarq se milti hai yaan muraad
      Duniya jo chor dii hai to uqbaa bhi chor day

      Taqleed ki rawish se tu behtar hai Khud-Kushi
      Rasta bhi dhoond, Hizar ka soda bhi chor day

      Mannand-e-Khama Teri zuban per hai harf-e-gair
      Begana Shay pe Nazish-e-Bejaa bhi chor day

      Lutaf-e-Qalaam kya je naa ho dil mein DARD-e-ISHQ
      Bismil nahe hai tu to Tarapna bhi chor day

      Shabnam ki tarah pholoon pe ro, aur chaman se Chal
      Iss Baagh mein Qyaam ka soda bhi chor day

      Acha hai dil kay pass rahay pasbanay Aqal
      Lakin kabhi kabhi issay tanha bhi chor day

      Hai Ashiquee mein rasam alag sab se bethna
      But-Khana bhi, Haram bhi, Kaleesa bhi chor day
      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      Majnoon nay sheher chora, tu Sehraa bhi chor day
      Nizaray ki hawas ho tu Laila bhi chor day

      Wa'az! kamal-e-tarq se milti hai yaan muraad
      Duniya jo chor dii hai to uqbaa bhi chor day

      Taqleed ki rawish se tu behtar hai Khud-Kushi
      Rasta bhi dhoond, Hizar ka soda bhi chor day

      Mannand-e-Khama Teri zuban per hai harf-e-gair
      Begana Shay pe Nazish-e-Bejaa bhi chor day

      Lutaf-e-Qalaam kya je naa ho dil mein DARD-e-ISHQ
      Bismil nahe hai tu to Tarapna bhi chor day

      Shabnam ki tarah pholoon pe ro, aur chaman se Chal
      Iss Baagh mein Qyaam ka soda bhi chor day

      Acha hai dil kay pass rahay pasbanay Aqal
      Lakin kabhi kabhi issay tanha bhi chor day

      Hai Ashiquee mein rasam alag sab se bethna
      But-Khana bhi, Haram bhi, Kaleesa bhi chor day
      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      Muslim Ne Tameer Kia Apna Haram Or
      Tehzeeb Ke Azar Ne Tarashwae Sanaum Or

      In Taza Khudaun Mein Barra Sab Se Watan Hay
      Jo Perhan Is Ka Hay Wo Mazhab Ka Kafan Hay

      Yeh Bu’t Ke Tarasheeda’e Tehzeeb’e Nav’ee Hay
      Gharat Gare Kashana’e Deen’e Nabavi(Pbuh) Hay

      Bazoo Tera Tohid Ki Qooat Se Qavi Hay
      Islam Tera Des Hay Tu Mustafavi Hay

      Nazara’e Dereena Zamane Ko Dikha De!!!!
      Ae Mustafavi Khak Mein Is Bu’t Ko Mila De!!!

      Ho Qa’de Muqami To Nateeja Hay Tabahi
      Reh Behar Mein Azad’e Watan Soorat’e Mahi

      Hay Tarke Watan Sunnat’e Mahboob’e Ilahi(Pbuh)
      De Tu Bhi Nabuwat Ki Sadaqat Pe Gavahi

      Guftar’e Siasat Mein Watan Or Hi Kuch Hay
      Irshad’e Nabuwat Mein Watan Or Hi Kuch Hay

      Aqwame Jahan Mein Hay Raqabat To Isi Se
      Taskheer Hay Maqsoode Tijarat To Isi Se

      Khali Hay Sadaqat Se Siasat To Isi Se
      Kamzor Ka Ghar Hota Hay Gharat To Isis Se

      Iqwam Mein Makhlooq’e Khuda Bat’ti Hay Is Se
      Qomee’at’e Islam Ki Jar Kat’ti Hay Is Se
      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      Muslim Ne Tameer Kia Apna Haram Or
      Tehzeeb Ke Azar Ne Tarashwae Sanaum Or

      In Taza Khudaun Mein Barra Sab Se Watan Hay
      Jo Perhan Is Ka Hay Wo Mazhab Ka Kafan Hay

      Yeh Bu’t Ke Tarasheeda’e Tehzeeb’e Nav’ee Hay
      Gharat Gare Kashana’e Deen’e Nabavi(Pbuh) Hay

      Bazoo Tera Tohid Ki Qooat Se Qavi Hay
      Islam Tera Des Hay Tu Mustafavi Hay

      Nazara’e Dereena Zamane Ko Dikha De!!!!
      Ae Mustafavi Khak Mein Is Bu’t Ko Mila De!!!

      Ho Qa’de Muqami To Nateeja Hay Tabahi
      Reh Behar Mein Azad’e Watan Soorat’e Mahi

      Hay Tarke Watan Sunnat’e Mahboob’e Ilahi(Pbuh)
      De Tu Bhi Nabuwat Ki Sadaqat Pe Gavahi

      Guftar’e Siasat Mein Watan Or Hi Kuch Hay
      Irshad’e Nabuwat Mein Watan Or Hi Kuch Hay

      Aqwame Jahan Mein Hay Raqabat To Isi Se
      Taskheer Hay Maqsoode Tijarat To Isi Se

      Khali Hay Sadaqat Se Siasat To Isi Se
      Kamzor Ka Ghar Hota Hay Gharat To Isis Se

      Iqwam Mein Makhlooq’e Khuda Bat’ti Hay Is Se
      Qomee’at’e Islam Ki Jar Kat’ti Hay Is Se
      The heart is the only broken instrument that works.

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      Thanks a lot Shab-e-Hijar

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      Nice job AB and Shab I will share some too soon.
      "The point is Allah. And everything besides Allah, is besides the point."