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    Results 1 to 4 of 4
    1. #1
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      The country was a mess, sadly the very people who had helped create the mess came to power. Still the events happening at the time were shocking even by today's standards.

      The ending of this article is quite powerful:

      Mr Zaidi remembers the day at the PID - Oct 7, 1958 - on which the Iskander Mirza-Ayub Khan martial law was declared, inflicting a deadly blow on the country's political and democratic system. In a contribution sent to Dawn, Mr Zaidi writes:

      The Press Information Department, Karachi, was a mirror in which the perceptive and trained eyes of experienced journalists saw not only the panorama of unfolding official and political activities of the government, but also shadows of coming events. Oct 7, 1958 appeared to be an unusual day. Something hung in the air. Veteran journalists accredited to the government had assembled in the press room by 10am. They expected some major news to break.

      The political climate in the city was loaded with rumours of declaration of martial law. The rumours had spread like wildfire and brought the reporters of important news agencies and newspapers to the PID. Their eyes focussed on the movement of Col Majeed Malik, principal information officer. He was in his office opposite the press room.

      A heated discussion was in progress among the journalists in the press room. There appeared to be a consensus that the political situation in the country had reached a dead-end and no solution was in sight. Malik Feroze Khan Noon had contrived a shaky coalition at the centre between the Republican Party and Mr H.S. Suhrawardy's Awami League.

      In East Pakistan, the KSP of Fazlul Haq and the Awami League were locked in a war of attrition. In the assembly session, Awami League MPAs had bodily lifted the KSP's speaker from his chair in the midst of the session, declared him insane and locked him up in a hospital.

      The deputy speaker who was a member of the Awami League occupied the speaker's chair. In the ensuing melee, some of the KSP legislators hit the deputy speaker on his head with a loudspeaker and killed him.

      In West Pakistan, Khan Abdul Qayum was on the warpath. He led a huge procession of the supporters of the Muslim League from Gujrat to Lahore shouting abusive slogans against President Iskander Mirza. To counter the Muslim League, Nawab Muzaffar Ali Qizalbash had organized a procession of the supporters of the Republican Party from Attock to Lahore.


      At about midnight, the telephone rang. Aslam Ali was on the line. In a voice shaking with excitement, he asked me to switch on the radio at once. I did so. Someone was reading the president's proclamation. The president had imposed martial law in the country and appointed Gen Mohammad Ayub Khan as the chief martial law administrator, abrogated the Constitution, dissolved the national and provincial assemblies, and dismissed the central and provincial governments.

      The next morning (Oct 8), General Ayub Khan addressed a crowded press conference in the committee room of the Cabinet secretariat in the National Assembly building. He was in his general's uniform, his face glowing with confidence. Behind him sat a string of severe-faced generals. At the end no one was in doubt that Ayub Khan was in charge. President Iskander Mirza had been sidelined.

      Driving back from the National Assembly building to the Press Information Department, I found myself sitting next to Col Majeed Malik in the staff car. He was deep in thought. I asked him: "Sir, who is the ruler?" He looked at me intently and said: "The gun."

      Col Majeed Malik was right. The country that had been founded by Jinnah with the votes of the people was now destined to live under the shadow of the gun.


      link

    2. #2
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      everytime the army came into politics from Fm Ayoub Khan to Gen Musharraf it was only because the civil democratic govts not only failed miserably, but crossed all limits of insanity in their pursuit for individual achievments that forced Pakistan's interests far behind. the lot of 1950s, the lot of 70s and the lot of 90s; each group made Pakistan politics a game making it inevitable for the army to literally save the country(from these insane politicians).

    3. #3
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      I disagree Haris, several Army officals played key roles from the beginning after Jinnahs death to try to assume power. AYub Khan was inducted formally into the Cabinet in the 1950's while Iskandier Mirza was an ex Army officer. Even right after Jinnahs death you had the Rawalpindi conspiracy..in the late 80's and early 90's large scale interference by key generals again destabilised Pakistans Democracy. Aslam Beg, Hamid gul and others were on record stating they would do anything neccessary to prevent the PPP from being elected.

      Just look at it in one respect, Two Army rules created in succession, ZAB, Sheikh Mujeebur Rehman, and Nawaz Sharif. They also ended in losing half the country, started sectarianism, the Kalashinkov culture ..the most recent one helped create the MMA, and turned the religo political parties from non entities in the mainstream to the third largest political force in the country.

      While I am highly appreciative of the Armed forces personnel and their fighting ability, facts are facts, they should not be involved in politics and should not be runing electricity suply Corporations or Language Authorities. And if serving officers are doing that, they should be ready to get criticised,...

    4. #4
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      I fully agree with that, you put it very nicely. These days, its like: "jootey bhee khao aur bolo bhee naa"! Pata naheen kab akal ayey gee is qaum ko?


      Originally posted by Zakk:
      I disagree Haris, several Army officals played key roles from the beginning after Jinnahs death to try to assume power. AYub Khan was inducted formally into the Cabinet in the 1950's while Iskandier Mirza was an ex Army officer. Even right after Jinnahs death you had the Rawalpindi conspiracy..in the late 80's and early 90's large scale interference by key generals again destabilised Pakistans Democracy. Aslam Beg, Hamid gul and others were on record stating they would do anything neccessary to prevent the PPP from being elected.

      Just look at it in one respect, Two Army rules created in succession, ZAB, Sheikh Mujeebur Rehman, and Nawaz Sharif. They also ended in losing half the country, started sectarianism, the Kalashinkov culture ..the most recent one helped create the MMA, and turned the religo political parties from non entities in the mainstream to the third largest political force in the country.

      While I am highly appreciative of the Armed forces personnel and their fighting ability, facts are facts, they should not be involved in politics and should not be runing electricity suply Corporations or Language Authorities. And if serving officers are doing that, they should be ready to get criticised,...