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  • Results 1 to 7 of 7
    1. #1
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      I learn something new everyday, today I learnt something from my brother so wanted to share here. Not sure how many knew this, but it was an interesting read.

      Muhammad Asad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Muhammad Asad (born Leopold Weiss in July 1900 in what was then Austro-Hungarian Lwów in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, now Lviv in Ukraine; died 1992) was a Jew who converted to Islam and later served as one of the first Pakistani ambassadors to the United Nations.


      [edit] Biography
      Asad was a descendant of a long line of rabbis. However, his father was a barrister. He received a thorough religious education. He was proficient in Hebrew from an early age and was also familiar with Aramaic. He studied the Old Testament, as well as the text and commentaries of the Talmud, the Mishna and Gemara. Furthermore, he delved into the intricacies of Biblical exegesis, the Targum.

      After abandoning university in Vienna, Asad (or Weiss, as he was then called) had drifted aimlessly around 1920s Germany, even working briefly for the expressionist film director Fritz Lang. By his own account after selling a jointly written film-script, he blew the windfall on a wild party at an expensive Berlin restaurant, in the spirit of the times. He got his first journalism published through sheer chutzpah while working as a telephone operator for an American news agency in Berlin. Using the simple expedient of ringing up her Berlin hotel room, he obtained an exclusive interview with the visiting wife of the Russian author Maxim Gorky, and the story was taken up by his employers.

      Weiss later moved to the British Mandate of Palestine, staying in Jerusalem at the house of an uncle, the psychoanalyst Dorian Weiss. He picked up work as a stringer for the Frankfurter Zeitung, selling articles on a freelance basis. His pieces were noteworthy for their understanding of Arab fears and grievances against the Zionist project. Eventually contracted as a full-time foreign correspondent for the paper, his assignments led him to an ever deepening engagement with Islam, which after much thought led to his religious conversion in 1926. He spoke of Islam thus:

      "Islam appears to me like a perfect work of architecture. All its parts are harmoniously conceived to complement and support each other; nothing is superfluous and nothing lacking; and the result is a structure of absolute balance and solid composure."

      His travels and sojourns through Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Iran (he wrote many insightful articles on Shiism), and also Afghanistan and the southern Soviet Republics, were viewed with great suspicion by the Colonial Powers. One English diplomat in Saudi Arabia described him in a report as a "Bolshevik", and it is true that he took a close interest in the many liberation movements that were active at this time with the aim of freeing Muslim lands from colonial rule. He ended up in India where he met and worked alongside Muhammad Iqbal, the poet-philosopher, who had proposed the idea of an independent Muslim state in India, which later became Pakistan
      Back by public demand..you're now rockin with a one man band
      Feel the music and you wonder...is he a Yankee? No I'm a Londoner

    2. #2
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      correction- maybe not the first but among the early ambassadors.
      Back by public demand..you're now rockin with a one man band
      Feel the music and you wonder...is he a Yankee? No I'm a Londoner

    3. #3
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      arjay's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Rebel X View Post
      I learn something new everyday, today I learnt something from my brother so wanted to share here. Not sure how many knew this, but it was an interesting read.

      Muhammad Asad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

      Muhammad Asad (born Leopold Weiss in July 1900 in what was then Austro-Hungarian Lwów in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, now Lviv in Ukraine; died 1992) was a Jew who converted to Islam and later served as one of the first Pakistani ambassadors to the United Nations.


      [edit] Biography
      Asad was a descendant of a long line of rabbis. However, his father was a barrister. He received a thorough religious education. He was proficient in Hebrew from an early age and was also familiar with Aramaic. He studied the Old Testament, as well as the text and commentaries of the Talmud, the Mishna and Gemara. Furthermore, he delved into the intricacies of Biblical exegesis, the Targum.

      After abandoning university in Vienna, Asad (or Weiss, as he was then called) had drifted aimlessly around 1920s Germany, even working briefly for the expressionist film director Fritz Lang. By his own account after selling a jointly written film-script, he blew the windfall on a wild party at an expensive Berlin restaurant, in the spirit of the times. He got his first journalism published through sheer chutzpah while working as a telephone operator for an American news agency in Berlin. Using the simple expedient of ringing up her Berlin hotel room, he obtained an exclusive interview with the visiting wife of the Russian author Maxim Gorky, and the story was taken up by his employers.

      Weiss later moved to the British Mandate of Palestine, staying in Jerusalem at the house of an uncle, the psychoanalyst Dorian Weiss. He picked up work as a stringer for the Frankfurter Zeitung, selling articles on a freelance basis. His pieces were noteworthy for their understanding of Arab fears and grievances against the Zionist project. Eventually contracted as a full-time foreign correspondent for the paper, his assignments led him to an ever deepening engagement with Islam, which after much thought led to his religious conversion in 1926. He spoke of Islam thus:

      "Islam appears to me like a perfect work of architecture. All its parts are harmoniously conceived to complement and support each other; nothing is superfluous and nothing lacking; and the result is a structure of absolute balance and solid composure."

      His travels and sojourns through Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Iran (he wrote many insightful articles on Shiism), and also Afghanistan and the southern Soviet Republics, were viewed with great suspicion by the Colonial Powers. One English diplomat in Saudi Arabia described him in a report as a "Bolshevik", and it is true that he took a close interest in the many liberation movements that were active at this time with the aim of freeing Muslim lands from colonial rule. He ended up in India where he met and worked alongside Muhammad Iqbal, the poet-philosopher, who had proposed the idea of an independent Muslim state in India, which later became Pakistan
      Firstly---WIKIPEDIA is quite unauthentic! It says a lot of different things on my dad--that I know of.

      Secondly----Amjad Ali could have been the first permenant rep. of Pak to U.N.

      I am not too sure on Amjad Ali even..hence I'll ask about it from Mr. Iqbal Akhund (our Atiqa's father-in-law) who has remained our per.rep to U.N...and I am sure he'd know a lot about that.

      -Raju
      Jeevay Jeevay PAKISTAN

    4. #4
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      zobia's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Rebel X View Post
      His travels and sojourns through Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Iran (he wrote many insightful articles on Shiism), and also Afghanistan
      why on Shi'ism?
      "There are two rules for ultimate success in life: #1. Never tell everything you know." ;)

    5. #5
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      STONECOLD's Avatar
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      For an account of this persons life....please read "a road to Mecca" ...detailing the authors conversion and subsequent to reach Mecca. Also details his friendship with first rulers of the house of Saud. I throughly enjoyed this book!

    6. #6
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      Quote Originally Posted by zobia View Post
      why on Shi'ism?
      i dunno, why dont u go find out and share with the class
      Back by public demand..you're now rockin with a one man band
      Feel the music and you wonder...is he a Yankee? No I'm a Londoner

    7. #7
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      Quote Originally Posted by arjay View Post
      Firstly---WIKIPEDIA is quite unauthentic!

      Secondly----Amjad Ali could have been the first permenant rep. of Pak to U.N.

      [COLOR=#800080]I am not too sure on Amjad Ali even..hence I'll ask about it from Mr. Iqbal Akhund
      I understand wikipedia can be quite inaccurate, the intenthere was to say that there was this person, who wrote certain books and was involved in Pakistan movement.

      My hope was that people would have more information of their own to add about him, which has not been the case thus far

      secondly, You may have missed it, but I noted right after my first post that maybe not the first but among the early ambassadors to the UN.

      please do post more about him when you find out.,
      Back by public demand..you're now rockin with a one man band
      Feel the music and you wonder...is he a Yankee? No I'm a Londoner

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